November 28, 2020

Coronavirus live news: WHO warns Covid ‘not tired of us’ as top UK scientist says vaccine ‘feels like watershed moment’

https://www.theguardian.com/world/live/2020/nov/10/coronavirus-live-news-who-warns-covid-not-tired-of-us-as-top-uk-scientist-says-vaccine-feels-like-watershed-moment




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UK’s health service asked to be ready to deploy vaccine in December

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Global renewable electricity installation will hit a record level in 2020, according to the International Energy Agency, in sharp contrast with the declines caused by the coronavirus pandemic in the fossil fuel sectors.

The IEA report published on Tuesday says almost 90% of new electricity generation in 2020 will be renewable, with just 10% powered by gas and coal. The trend puts green electricity on track to become the largest power source in 2025, displacing coal, which has dominated for the past 50 years.

Growing acceptance of the need to tackle the climate crisis by cutting carbon emissions has made renewable energy increasingly attractive to investors. The IEA reports that shares in renewable equipment makers and project developers have outperformed most major stock market indices and that the value of shares in solar companies has more than doubled since December 2019:




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Summary

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A study from researchers at the University of Oxford and NIHR Oxford Health Biomedical Research Centre found that nearly one in five people who have had Covid-19 were diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder – such as anxiety, depression or insomnia – within three months of testing positive for the virus. In the story below, we speak to survivors about their experiences:




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People are planning to drive and fly more in future than they did before the coronavirus pandemic, a survey suggests, even though the overwhelming majority accept human responsibility for the climate crisis.

The apparent disconnect between beliefs and actions raises fears that without strong political intervention, these actions could undermine efforts to meet the targets set in the Paris agreement and hopes of a green recovery from the coronavirus crisis.

Approximately 26,000 people in 25 countries were polled in July and August by the YouGov-Cambridge Globalism Project, in a survey designed with the Guardian.

By a ratio of more than three to one, the respondents agreed humankind was mainly or partly to blame for the climate emergency:




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China inflation dips to 11-year low as pork stocks rise




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Blocking Taiwan at WHO will increase hostility to China, premier says




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